My name is Daisy. but that's not my real name. but my real name is SILLY. also I like Hannibal and stuff. and Shakespeare and music and stuff and I'm grumpy but in an endearing way

24th April 2014

Photoset reblogged from how does this song go? with 17,660 notes

awkwardsituationist:

tsingy de bemaraha national park, a unesco world heritage site in western madagascar, is home to lemurs who, with thick pads on their hands and feet, navigate this six hundred square kilometer labyrinth of three hundred foot tall razor sharp limestone pillars.

photographer stephen alvarez (previously featured) remarked, “it’s an unbelievable experience to watch them [as] they jump like acrobats from the sharp pinnacles” — a feat made more remarkable given the vast chasm bellow.

in the malagasy language, tsingy means “where one cannot walk barefoot,” and alvarez noted that that given the difficulty of the terrain, it takes an entire day to walk half a mile.

nearly impenetrable, the area is described as a refuge within paradise. lemurs, like ninety percent of the species in madagascar, are endemic to the island, and thanks to the isolation of the refuge have evolved into tsingy’s eleven distinct species, including the decken’s sifaka seen here.

Source: awkwardsituationist

24th April 2014

Photoset reblogged from how does this song go? with 4,406 notes

rearadmiral-comsmocock:

fionagoddess:

Big Fish (2003)

I want his blue suit so damn bad

Source: fionagoddess

24th April 2014

Photoset reblogged from I lost my shoe with 47,023 notes

wickedclothes:

Glow In The Dark Heart Locket Necklace

This heart-shaped silver locket holds a blue, glass, heart-shaped inside which glows bright blue in the dark. The locket features ornate carving to accent the piece and to provide a unique and enchanting lighting effect. Hung on a silver-plated chain. Sold on Etsy.

Source: wickedclothes

24th April 2014

Photo reblogged from Bisexual. Bilingual. Bitch. with 45,337 notes

Source: charmingart013

24th April 2014

Photo reblogged from Fashions From History with 581 notes

fashionsfromhistory:

Armor Garniture of George Clifford, Third Earl of Cumberland
Made under the direction of Jacob Halder 
1586

George Clifford (1558–1605) was appointed Queen’s Champion in 1590 and was made a Knight of the Garter two years later. He is best remembered for his capture of the Spanish fort in San Juan, Puerto Rico, in 1598. A favorite of Queen Elizabeth I (reigned 1558–1603), he chose for the decoration of this armor the Tudor rose, the French fleur-de-lis (then part of the English arms), and the cipher of Elizabeth, two E’s back to back.The Cumberland armor is part of a garniture for field and tournament use. It was made in the royal workshops at Greenwich under the direction of the master armorer Jacob Halder (documented in England 1558–1608). The complete garniture is illustrated in the Jacobe Album, a late sixteenth-century manuscript of pen-and-wash drawings that records the decorated armors produced in the Greenwich workshops. The surviving pieces are the man’s armor and several exchange or reinforcing elements––a grandguard (defense for the lower face and upper left torso), passguard (defense for the left elbow), and four vamplates (hand defenses affixed to the lance) for the tilt; a close helmet with detachable visor reinforce for the tournament fought on foot––and horse armor, consisting of a shaffron (head defense) and saddle plates.
The Cumberland armor is the best preserved armor garniture from the royal workshops at Greenwich. It represents a technical and decorative high point of the Greenwich school.

MET

fashionsfromhistory:

Armor Garniture of George Clifford, Third Earl of Cumberland

Made under the direction of Jacob Halder 

1586

George Clifford (1558–1605) was appointed Queen’s Champion in 1590 and was made a Knight of the Garter two years later. He is best remembered for his capture of the Spanish fort in San Juan, Puerto Rico, in 1598. A favorite of Queen Elizabeth I (reigned 1558–1603), he chose for the decoration of this armor the Tudor rose, the French fleur-de-lis (then part of the English arms), and the cipher of Elizabeth, two E’s back to back.

The Cumberland armor is part of a garniture for field and tournament use. It was made in the royal workshops at Greenwich under the direction of the master armorer Jacob Halder (documented in England 1558–1608). The complete garniture is illustrated in the Jacobe Album, a late sixteenth-century manuscript of pen-and-wash drawings that records the decorated armors produced in the Greenwich workshops. The surviving pieces are the man’s armor and several exchange or reinforcing elements––a grandguard (defense for the lower face and upper left torso), passguard (defense for the left elbow), and four vamplates (hand defenses affixed to the lance) for the tilt; a close helmet with detachable visor reinforce for the tournament fought on foot––and horse armor, consisting of a shaffron (head defense) and saddle plates.

The Cumberland armor is the best preserved armor garniture from the royal workshops at Greenwich. It represents a technical and decorative high point of the Greenwich school.

MET

23rd April 2014

Question reblogged from oh, ugh. is love really going to save us all? with 676 notes

therealshingetter1 asked: Excuse me, I saw your post on Greek lore inaccuracies, and I have a question. In the story explaining how Hades kidnaps Persephone, it's often called "The Rape of Persephone". Did this actually happen within context, or is it a mistranslation or an exaggeration or something else? It's been bugging me for years now and I'd appreciate your opinion on the matter.

lyriumpomegranates:

soloontherocks:

Rape in historical context means “kidnap”. Rape might have been involved, of course, possibly, but the name of the myth itself is not a reference to it.

For instance, the Rape of the Lock is a poem about someone stealing a lock of hair without permission from a maiden with beautiful hair.

I will point out that regardless of what might or might have happened beforehand, Haides is probably the best husband in all of Greek mythology. He has only two affairs — which let’s face it is pretty big for a Greek deity — and Persephone rules as his equal, not his inferior wife.

I’ll also point out that Persephone’s myth is a strong metaphor for a woman’s life — through the lens of an ancient Greek understanding of women, of course — and this is HUGELY important to context.

At the beginning she is nothing, a minor flower goddess, her entire identity merely “Demeter’s daughter”, even her name — Kore — just meant “the maiden.” Akin to how in childhood a daughter’s role was to be (quite literally, if you’re familiar with ancient Greek marriage law) owned by her parents. A daughter’s identity is as their parents’ daughter, nothing more. How many teenage girls have complained over the years as not being recognized as individuals with their own tastes and personality?

Then she gets carried off by a man who wishes to marry her…and I’ll point out in many more detailed versions of the myth Haides asks Zeus’ permission first. Which of course is a clear reference to a man meeting with a father to discuss the arranged marriage of the daughter. Mind you, ancient Greek wedding ceremony included a mock kidnapping. That was part of how they understood weddings to work. Also, of course, this was ancient Greece, women did not have much of a say in who they married.

THEN Persephone gets taken to the underworld — her husband’s “house” — and that’s when the most important part happens. Haides does not force her to eat the pomegranate seeds that doom her to spend half the year in the Underworld. She chooses to eat them. And if you think one of the most important goddesses in all of mythology was too stupid to know what that would mean, well, you probably need to rethink your understanding of Deity. But yes, Persephone CHOOSES to eat them.

Why? Because beforehand she was her mother’s daughter, Kore, the girl-child. After, she is Persephone, queen of the underworld and equal partner in her husband’s affairs. In myth she repeatedly overrules his decisions, even, or makes decisions for him. Her power only comes to her when she becomes an adult, through marriage. Mind you, the pomegranate is a classic strong symbol of female power and creation and mystery (not to mention, uh, blood). It’s overall a blatant representation of the tranformation from girlhood to womanhood. Yes, this was ancient Greece, so they assumed a woman would always wind up married. But in ancient Greece, a girl was without power. A married woman, however, basically ran the entire household and estate. The husband had shit to do, the wife was the one who commanded the servants and made business decisions for the household while the husband was out soldiering or whatever. A married woman was basically the most powerful thing a girl could possibly hope to be in ancient Greece.

Even without that ancient Greek view, it’s still a powerful metaphor for even modern womanhood. Because she CHOOSES to eat the pomegranates. She CHOOSES to become an adult.

Whatever happened with Haides before that, it’s irrelevant. Unimportant. Haides is important and good in her life because he assists in her transition to adulthood — he literally makes it possible — the way a good Greek husband does, and then proceeds to be an excellent husband, by mythology standards. She would never have become a woman under her mother’s roof.

Also, of course, there’s the whole “the myths are not meant to be taken literally in this religion and if you do the ancients will laugh at you as if you were a grownup who believed in Santa Claus” thing at play, so even if the story did include rape, it’s not literal, it’s a metaphor.

Mention because I’m going to answer this publicly and I don’t know if you follow me: therealshingetter1

If you’re still interested in the subject, elaphos is a Haides devotee.

I LOVE THIS POST. BLESS YOU OP

Source: soloontherocks

23rd April 2014

Post

my fucking russian professor spelled out what he calls me in class with the english alphabet in an email about the vans going to bjork and i’m just fucking dying what the fucking fuck why would you fucking do that it looks so dumb

Tagged: Pushkin is our everythingthat's my russian tag nowcollege adventuresThe Lawrence Difference

23rd April 2014

Audio post - Played 14 times

Romeo, Romeo and Juliet

'Tis torture and not mercy.  Heaven is here
Where Juliet lives, and every cat and dog
And little mouse, every unworthy thing,
Live here in heaven and may look on her,
But Romeo may not.  More validity,
More honorable state, more courtship lives
In carrion flies than Romeo.  They may seize
On the white wonder of dear Juliet’s hand
And steal immortal blessing from her lips,
Who even in pure and vestal modesty
Still blush, as thinking their own kisses sin;
But Romeo may not; he is banished.
Flies may do this, but I from this must fly.
They are free men, but I am banished.
And sayest thou yet that exile is not death?
Hadst thou no poison mixed, no sharp-ground knife,
No sudden mean of death, though ne’er so mean,
But “banished” to kill me?  ”Banished”?
O Friar, the damned use that word in hell.
Howling attends it.  How hast thou the heart,
Being a divine, a ghostly confessor,
A sin absolver, and my friend professed,
To mangle me with that word “banished”?

Tagged: shakespeare monologue memeShakespeareme talkingI haven't done this one in a while but it's still painful for melike what the hell why does this hurt so muchprobably because my focus for this character was so intenseRomeo and Juliet

23rd April 2014

Audio post - Played 12 times

Edmund, King Lear

This is the excellent foppery of the world, that when we are sick in fortune, often the surfeits of our own behavior, we make guilty of our disasters the sun, the moon, and stars; as if we were villains on necessity; fools by heavenly compulsion; knaves, thieves, and treachers by spherical predominance; drunkards, liars, and adulterers by an enforced obedience of planetary influence; and all that we are evil in, by a divine thrusting on.  An admirable evasion of whoremaster man, to lay his goatish disposition on the charge of a star.  My father compounded my mother under the Dragon’s tail, and my nativity was under Ursa Major, so that it follows I am rough and lecherous.  Tut! I should have been that I am, had the maidenliest star in the firmament twinkled on my bastardizing.  Edgar — and pat he comes, like the catastrophe of the old comedy.  My cue is villainous melancholy, with a sigh like Tom o’ Bedlam. — O, these eclipses do portend these divisions.

Tagged: shakespeare monologue memeShakespeareKing Learme talking

23rd April 2014

Post reblogged from A mystical experience shared by everyone with 166 notes

monologue voicepost meme!

watertightvines:

In honor of Shakespeare’s birthday, I thought it’d be fun to do a meme. The criteria are simple:

  • Record yourself reading a Shakespearean monologue.
  • Post it and tag it with “shakespeare monologue meme.”

That’s it. That’s the meme. What you read and how you read it is up to you! Playing multiple times is encouraged. :D

Tagged: doing this because I'm procrastinatingShakespeareshakespeare monologue meme

Source: watertightvines